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Michael Linton's Bayeux Tapestry: 1066 - A Medieval Mosaic and Puzzles

Medieval Mosaic

THE
BATTLE ABBEY ROLL.

WITH SOME
ACCOUNT OF THE NORMAN LINEAGES.

BY THE
DUCHESS OF CLEVELAND.

IN THREE VOLUMES.—VOL. II

LONDON:
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.
1889.

LONDON:
PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, LIMITED,
STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.

This electronic edition
was prepared by
Michael A. Linton, 2007
www.1066.co.nz

Loruge :

for Loring. In Leland's list this is joined to the name that here precedes it, as "Loring et Loterel." We find it in Bedfordshire and Devonshire. "A manor in Chalgrave was held under the Beauchamps, in the twelfth century, by the family of Loring. Sir Nigel or Neale Loring, who was knighted by King Edward III. for his bravery in a sea-fight at Sluys in 1340, who attended that monarch in his glorious campaign in France, in the year 1359, and was one of the Knights Companion of the Garter at the original institution of that Order, retired to spend his latter days at Chalgrave, where, in 1365, he had the royal license to enclose a park. This Sir Neale Loring was founder of a chantry in Chalgrave church. Two ancient altar tombs (one on each side the nave) with effigies in stone of knights in armour with mail gorgets, have been supposed to belong to some of this family; but it must be observed, that none of the shields, of which there are several on the tombs, exhibit the arms of Loring."—Lysons

Bedfordshire. Leland tells us that Sir Neale was buried in the church of the Black Canons at Dunstable. "Ther lay buried also in this Priory one Nigellus Loring, a Noble Man of Bedfordshire, and a great Benefactor to this Priory.

"This Nigellus made 3. Cantuaries in the Paroch Chirch of Tuddington" (Toddington) "in Bedfordshire a 2. miles from Dunestaple, and there, as I hear say, ly buried sum of that Stokke." He was the same "Nele Loring of Knowston-Beaupell, Landekey," in Devonshire, mentioned temp. Ed. III.; who, "under Richard II., wrote himself of Kingston."—Westcote's Devon. The manor of Landkey was the original seat of the family of Beauple or Beaple, and had come to him through his wife Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir Ralph Beauple of Cnubeston (Knowston), and Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Alan Bloyho. By her he had two daughters and heirs; Isabel, the wife of Robert Lord Harington; and Margaret, married to John Peyvre of Tuddington (now Toddington) in Bedfordshire. He died in 1386. "The earliest existing representation of one of the first Knights Founders in the Habit of the Order of the Garter," writes Sir Harris Nicolas, "is that of Sir Nigel Loring, which occurs in the list of Benefactors to St. Albans Abbey." The grateful monks preserved not only the names, but the portraits, of those who contributed to their revenues, and Sir Nigel is introduced as the donor of 10 marks. He appears as an old man with a red cap or hood on his head, and red shoes on his feet, covered with a white robe powdered with Garters, and holds a purse in his left hand. He bore Quarterly, Gules and Argent, a bend Or.

The name is still kept by Ingelby-Loringe, in Yorkshire. Its original form was Le Lorrain; and in the last years of the twelfth century we find it entered in the Rotuli Curiae Regis as Le Loherain, Le Lohereng, Le Lohereg, and Le Loereng. In the Liber Niger it is Loerene.

It remained in Gloucestershire till the last century. "Haymes, a manor within the tything of Southam, continued in the name and family of Lorrange for 400 years, from the time of Ed. II."—Rudder's Gloucestershire. Lorrenge Farm is near Cam. An epitaph in Oundle Church informs us of their descent. "Here lyeth the body of William Loring, died 1628, 2nd son of William Loringe of Haymes in the co. of Gloucester, lineally descended from the brother of the Honble. Sir Neele Loring."